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Contesting Online Forums : Tips : Emblem Forums Help

1-3 of 3 messages

  Page 1 of 1  


Emblem Reply
by TA3J on January 31, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
Why are amateur radio club emblems generally in the shape of parallelogram ?
Does anybody have any idea ?
73,
TA3J
 
RE: Emblem Reply
by K3BU on February 4, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
That shape resembles tower with points at the top and bottom. So it signifies the antenna and then some other markings or letters are attached.
 
RE: Emblem Reply
by TA3J on August 31, 2002 Mail this to a friend!
from http://www.qsl.net/ta3j/others.htm

QUESTION & ANSWER
Why are amateur radio club emblems generally in the shape of parallelogram ? Does anybody have any idea ? 73,
Berkin AYDOGMUS, TA3J

That shape resembles tower with points at the top and bottom. So it signifies the antenna and then some other markings or letters are attached.
Yuri Z. BLANAROVICH, K3BU

The ARRL emblem provided the model for many organizations that followed. As N5NJ points out, the ARRL emblem incorporated an antenna, inductor, and earth ground schematic that symbolized both a receiver and a transmitter. The shape of the emblem was formed by placing the letters "A", "R", "R", and "L" at the four compass points.
Leigh S. JONES, KR6X

I do not have an answer to your parallelogram question.
Bob JOSUWEIT, WA3PZO

Berkin, According to a staffer here at ARRL: "ARRL started using it; others copied. See
"At the Sign of the Diamond," August 1926 QST, p.17." 73,
Brennan PRICE, N4QX

I believe that it is an outline of the shape of a simple receiver schematic.The antenna would be at the top, a ground symbol at the bottom and so on. Anyone else know for sure ?
Bob NAUMANN, N5NJ

Berkin, here's what Dave Sumner K1ZZ sent in response to my inquiry about the shape of the emblems for many of the amateur radio societies. 73,
Rod STAFFORD, W6ROD
Working backward, in August 1926 QST page 17 K. B. Warner said:
"At the Sign of the Diamond"
"About seven years ago the A.R.R.L. adopted an emblem, the now-familiar diamond. It is interesting to note how the idea has spread around the world until now many radio societies have emblems based on the original concept of a diamond containing radio symbols and the initials of the association. This similarity is pleasing, for it makes the diamond the sign of the radio amateur....It is probable that when the device of the International Amateur Radio Union is determined upon, it too will be in the diamond family."
Warner filed for a patent on the design for a "fraternal button" on August 26, 1920 and it was granted to him on April 25, 1922.
It first appeared in QST in July 1920 (explanation is on page 23). The ARRL Board had adopted the diamond emblem at its previous meeting.
I don't find any explanation for the diamond shape other than that the design was principally for a lapel pin, the shape of which would signify a radio amateur.
Dave K1ZZ

Now you have me wondering. I have no idea why amateur radio club emblems are shaped like a parallelogram. Now it is in my mind and I am thinking about that question. I hope I can sleep now!!! 73
Larry SANDERSON, KDYZ

I do not know why the emblems are such.
Valeri Ivanov STEFANOFF, LZ2CJ

Really I don't know and I didn't do it! (Hi)
Bilal EKMEKCI, TA8A



 

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